About Us

Our work began in Liberia’s remote, last mile communities, and is now growing globally. We’re partnering with countries to design and build community-based primary health systems. Together, we link community health workers with nurses, doctors, and midwives at community clinics. We train and support these teams of community and frontline health workers to bring life-saving services—from vaccines to maternal and neonatal care—to the doorsteps of people living far from care.

Our Mission

Our mission is to save lives in the world’s most remote communities.

Our Vision

Our vision is a health worker within reach of everyone, everywhere.

Our History

2007

Founding Last Mile Health

Last Mile Health is founded by Liberian civil war survivors and American health workers under the name Tiyatien Health, which means “justice in health” in a local dialect.

2010

BRINGING CARE TO HIV/AIDS PATIENTS

Fueled by the belief that no patient should be out of reach, our founders launch Liberia’s first rural, public HIV treatment program with only $6,000, raised during Raj Panjabi and Amisha Raja’s wedding. In 2010, we partnered with the Government of Liberia and the Global Fund to Fight AIDS, Tuberculosis, and Malaria to replicate our HIV treatment model in 19 public clinics across 12 of Liberia’s 15 counties.

2012

GOING TO KONOBO DISTRICT

We realize that to reach patients living in remote communities, we need to serve them directly in their homes. We partner with the Government of Liberia to pilot a community health worker program in Konobo District—one of the poorest and hardest-to-reach regions in the country. In just one year, teams of community and frontline health workers achieve 100% coverage of the district—resulting in an increase in clinic-based skilled birth attendance from 55% to 84%.

2014

SCALING OUR WORK COUNTY-WIDE

Encouraged by the results of the program in Konobo District, Liberia’s Ministry of Health invites us to replicate our community health worker program across Rivercess County as a pilot for nationwide scale.

2015

RESPONDING TO THE EBOLA EPIDEMIC

In partnership with the Government of Liberia between 2014-2015, we train more than 1,300 health workers and community members to rapidly educate communities, refer patients to care, and contain the spread of Ebola. Primary health services, which had all but shut down across Liberia, are never disrupted in the communities where we work.

2016

LAUNCHING LIBERIA’S NATIONAL PROGRAM

We collaborate with Liberia’s Ministry of Health and partners to design and launch the National Community Health Assistant Program to extend primary healthcare to 1.2 million people living at Liberia’s last mile.

2017

TRAINING THE HEALTH WORKFORCE

CEO Dr. Raj Panjabi accepts the 2017 TED Prize and gives a TED Talk announcing plans to launch the Community Health Academy. Leveraging open-source digital tools that improve the efficacy and efficiency of training, the Academy partners with Ministries of Health to strengthen the clinical skills of community health workers and the capacity of health systems leaders to build systems that deliver quality care.

Photo Credit: Bret Hartman/TED

2018

IMPROVING ACCESS TO QUALITY CARE

A controlled study in Rivercess County, where we have worked since 2016, demonstrates an increase in children receiving malaria, pneumonia, and diarrhea treatment by over 40%.

2019

BUILDING A MOVEMENT

The FY20-23 strategic plan is launched, outlining our commitment to build and strengthen three national community health workforces to reach over 9 million people in Africa and serve as global exemplars, and to share our best practices and lessons learned so that other countries can do the same.

2019 cont.

ADVANCING THE ACADEMY

Over 16,000 frontline health workers and health systems leaders across 182 countries enroll in the Academy’s first leadership course, Strengthening Community Health Worker Programs to Deliver Primary Health Care, which is co-produced with edX and HarvardX.

2020

EXPANDING OUR REACH

As the Government of Malawi implements a bold new National Community Health Strategy, we’re supporting them to ensure the program delivers essential primary health services to every person – no matter where they live. By 2023, the government’s National Community Health Strategy aims to deploy 16,000 community and frontline health workers to serve the approximately 15 million people living in rural and remote communities across Malawi.